Notation for social deduction games (part 2)

Warning: this post continues from Notation for social deduction games and will make no sense at all unless you've read that post first. So, my preferred notation for Spy Thriller games is a graph, where nodes represent players and links represent methods of introduction such as a shared password or meeting place: I'd be interested … Continue reading Notation for social deduction games (part 2)

Advertisements

Notation for social deduction games

This post focuses on the challenge of finding an abstraction that describes social deduction games in general. These games (e.g. werewolves, two rooms and a boom, spyfall) seem to require the sort of twisted thinking needed for security protocol design: a problem famously likened to programming Satan’s computer. What they tend to have in common … Continue reading Notation for social deduction games

The unintentional story telling comedy of an 18 month old

Terry Pratchet suggested that Homo Sapiens should in fact be called Pan Narrans - the ape that tells stories. Harari's Sapiens suggests that the ability to create myths, rather than greater intelligence, is in fact what separated us from Neanderthals. Either way it's generally agreed that myth plays a huge role in our culture. Most … Continue reading The unintentional story telling comedy of an 18 month old

Vans are like boats (Alpine road trip, 2010)

Vans are like boats, the sailing cruiser kind. The morning ritual of stowing everything that moves, flicking some switches on the board, culminates in firing up a cold engine to slowly move on to who knows where? I don't know yet, but usually somewhere beautiful. I love that feeling of the unknown combined with home … Continue reading Vans are like boats (Alpine road trip, 2010)

Unexpected smartphone failures in the mountains

I have a controversial opinion: that although smartphones are not a substitute for navigation skills, they can in the right circumstances substitute a physical map and compass. Agree or disagree, if you ever use smartphones in the mountains it is important to be aware of the ways they can fail, some of which are not … Continue reading Unexpected smartphone failures in the mountains

Successful climbs, successful falls

The best stories happen when things go slightly - but only slightly - wrong. Fortunately these are hugely outnumbered by times when things went right: my incomplete logbook contains around 1700 climbs, of which a few hundred were exciting in a good and safe way. The reporting bias on this blog is extreme. How do … Continue reading Successful climbs, successful falls